Taking Too Many Medicines – Polypharmacy

Health

Have you ever been a victim of getting a lot of unnecessary medication as part of your everyday medication routine? I also believe it’s crucial to get this message over as polypharmacy is getting to be a larger issue for a lot of individuals.

Polypharmacy

  • A patient is prescribed a lot of medications that aren’t needed.
  • A patient is taking a lot of types of medication.
  • Even if drugs are required, the individual needs to take a whole lot of pills daily – so many that the individual may get overwhelmed or confused.
Dna, Biology, Medicine, Gene

What happened with my own aunt was that she ended up taking medication to deal with the side effects of these drugs she’d been carrying. Since her physician prescribed the drugs, she believed she had to accept them for the remainder of her life getting the best price. She found it quite hard on her head and body to eliminate her prescription medication from her everyday routine – why else would the physician prescribe them?

The only real reason she stopped carrying nearly all of her meds would be since she finally could not manage them (that is a whole other matter!) Her drug list had attained a total of 18 unique drugs to be obtained in 1 day – that amount went down to just 4 drugs once all was said and done. WHAT?!!!

I explained to her all 18 medications weren’t wanted and she had been reaching a hazard zone, however, she had an explanation as to why she wanted all of them. She agrees today that she had been carrying a lot of medications.

There can be a few people who do want 18 or more drugs for medical reasons, but in any event, make sure you discuss your medication record with your physician and pharmacist every so often so as to maintain your medication list up – that I see firsthand how patients have been affected by being overmedicated.

Keep in mind, drugs might be regarded as strong inspectors, but they can make a great deal of damage also. I believe that it’s important for individuals to understand that more medications do not necessarily mean better outcomes.